(no subject)

Jul. 20th, 2017 05:36 pm
skygiants: Fakir from Princess Tutu leaping through a window; text 'doors are for the weak' (drama!!!)
[personal profile] skygiants
Death of a Pirate: British Radio and the Making of the Information Age is a fairly fascinating book that's trying to do a lot of things at once: the book starts out with the dramatic recounting of MURDER!!! and then immediately take, if not a deep dive, at least a moderate swim through such varied topics as the history of British radio and the BBC, Keynesian economic philosophy, copyright limitations, and the founding of Sealand in order to contextualize it.

The actual story of the murder in question, because it's fairly bonkers in and of itself and involves the rivalry between two pirate radio impresarios in 1966. Oliver Smedley, An Ardent Free-Trade Capitalist, was running a station called Radio Atlanta on a boat off the coast; Reggie Calvert, A Dance Hall Impresario had taken over an entire abandoned British navy fort called Shivering Sands in the Thames Estuary and staffed it with a rotating encampment of youths running a station called Radio City. At one point Smedley and Calvert were going to have a merger, but then they had an ACRIMONIOUS BREAKUP spurred on in part by:

- the fact that Smedley was supposed to give Calvert a shiny new transmitter and instead provided an old one that never worked
- the fact that Smedley never paid all the bills he had promised Calvert that Radio Atlanta would pay
- the fact that Calvert got sick of all this and decided to merge with another station instead

The reason for all these pirate radio stations on boats and naval forts, by the way, is because in 1966 there was no legal pop radio in the UK (as explained, extensively, via the history of radio and Keynesian economic theory etc. that makes up the first half of the book). Because the pirates were technically outside of UK territory, on the other hand, they could technically get away with doing whatever they wanted, or at least the government like "it will be way too embarrassing to launch a huge naval raid against a bunch of youths on a fort with a radio transmitter, so let's not."

HOWEVER, the fact that everything was happening outside of territorial waters where British laws and police had no jurisdiction BACKFIRED when:

- Ardent Free-Trade Capitalist Smedley decided he was so mad that Calvert had made a deal without him that he was going to MAKE SURE that the deal could never go through
- he was going to GET BACK HIS PROPERTY [the transmitter that had never worked]
- so he sent an ACTUAL OCCUPYING FORCE composed of out-of-work dockworkers to Shivering Stands, stole a bunch of key broadcasting equipment, took a bunch of it back to the mainland, and left a bunch of toughs to hold everybody who was on the station at that time hostage!!!
- (when they met the invading force, the hostage broadcasters were like 'welp' and made everybody tea)
- ("the vessel had to return briefly to pick up [the contractor who recruited the gang], who had been left behind drinking his tea")
- and then Smedley went to Calvert and his partner, an actual professional broadcaster, and was like 'I will not let you broadcast from there again or finish making your deal unless you pay me FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS'

Naturally, everyone involved was like 'wtf????' and refused to pay Smedley a dime; Calvert threatened to involve the police but the police were like 'ummmmmm technically we can't do anything for the same reasons we haven't been able to stop you from broadcasting;' Calvert then made a whole bunch of other even wilder threats; and all the hired dockworkers sat around cheerfully charging Smedley for hostaging operations which he was rapidly running out of money for.

Anyway, in the middle of all this, Calvert drove out to Smedley's house in the middle of the night and started screaming at him, and Smedley shot him and then claimed self-defense and that his HOSTILE OCCUPATION OF A POP RADIO STATION was just a little joke gone wrong! No harm no foul if only Calvert hadn't been so UPSET about it! It did help Smedley's self-defense case that Calvert happened to be carrying A FAKE PEN FULL OF NERVE GAS at the time, which apparently, according to his family, he always carried around just for safekeeping.

...so the author's point in writing about all this seems to be that a.) this incident was crucial in getting the pirate radio boats shut down and the formation of the current BBC radio system that includes actual pop radio, b.) that this is all a forerunner of later copyright battles and offshore data centers and so on, c.) pirate-radio-on-boats in the 1960s was a WILD TIME. About the latter, at least, he is most surely not mistaken.

(This has nothing to do with the main brunt of the book but I have to spare a mention for Radio City's chief engineer, who later was hired by the mob! to perform an assassination attempt!! using a spring-loaded hypodermic needle full of cyanide!!! in what it turns out was ACTUALLY a sting operation by the U.S. Treasury department who picked the hapless Radio City engineer to act as the assassin because "he needed the fee while being clearly incapable of killing anybody"!!!! This whole incident gets two pages in the book because it's somewhat irrelevant to the author's argument but seriously, where is this guy's movie?

For the record, the same mobsters then tried to intimidate Reggie Calvert's widow into selling them the remnants of the station and she was like 'lol no' and they were like '....well, when a lady knows her own mind, she knows her own mind! No hard feelings.')

what i saw July 19, 2017 at 09:58PM

Jul. 20th, 2017 04:58 am
ironymaiden: (beholder)
[personal profile] ironymaiden

Four goals, four players. CUT OFF ONE HEAD, TWO MORE WILL RISE something i saw

Feed

Jul. 18th, 2017 08:12 pm
ironymaiden: (reader boys)
[personal profile] ironymaiden
I am not a zombie fan. But I do like a good political thriller. And Feed is a post-zombie political thriller.

the ebook is on sale right now.

Some Stuff

Jul. 18th, 2017 11:53 am
berryandthorn: (forest)
[personal profile] berryandthorn
  • This month I fell into a bit of a reading slump, and I've been slowly working my way out of it by reading a whole bunch of middle grade books. I just finished Ghost by Jason Reynolds and Olive's Ocean by Kevin Henkes. Olive's Ocean is an old favorite (I remember listening the audiobook when I was around the same age as the main character, Martha) and oh boy, did it hold up the second time around. I can't help but love how conflicted and miserable Martha is through most of the story because that's, more or less, how I felt when I was twelve: lonely and awkward and tired of everyone, especially everyone in my family. Olive's Ocean is also a very small story--one summer with one family--that still feels huge and deeply emotional. 
  • Ghost is pretty short. Even shorter than Olive's Ocean, which I read all the way through in one day. It's also hilarious, and features two things I adore: a snarky kid narrator and an "inspirational coach" type of character who's almost just as snarky. If anything, I wish that this one had been a little longer, but it's part of a series, so I will be able to spend more time with the characters once the second book comes out. 
  • I emailed in my application for peer tutoring a few days ago. I won't be getting an answer back for a couple more days, but I have a pretty good feeling about my chances. Mostly I'm just worried about filling the position for one of the classes that fits with the rest of my schedule before someone else does. 
  • An idea for a short story was bugging me, so I decided to try writing it down last week. I ended up learning two things. One: I can still write short stories, but two: I don't actually want to write short stories right now. Which feels weird, since I always figured that I did still want to write short stories--I just hadn't come up with any good ideas yet. But ideas aren't the problem. The problem is that I'm just not interested in them. And maybe I was never interested in writing short stories as much as I was interested in publishing short stories...anyway, if I'm going to write, I want to enjoy what I'm writing, so after typing up a couple paragraphs I gave up and dumped it in my "Bits & Pieces" file. It really wasn't a bad beginning. I'm just not interested in continuing it. At all. 
  • Better writing news: my July Horror Movie Spotlight for TFI is up. This month it's I Am the Pretty Thing That Lives in the House, which I already talked about here and still have mixed feelings about. I always find things I should have changed in my posts after they're finished and posted, but I don't think this one turned out too bad. You can find it here.  
  • I'm getting caught up on My Favorite Murder. Episode 77 was amazing, and by that I mean it covered two absolutely horrific stories. I haven't listened to Lore in a while, so that's next on my list. 

(no subject)

Jul. 17th, 2017 08:54 pm
skygiants: C-ko the shadow girl from Revolutionary Girl Utena in prince drag (someday my prince will come)
[personal profile] skygiants
[personal profile] genarti read The Privilege of the Sword for the first time recently, because I had been telling her to since 2008, and then kept trying to talk to me about it. Unfortunately at this point I did not remember most of the things she was trying to talk to me about because I hadn't read it since 2007, so eventually I also had to reread it in self-defense.

It turns out this is still and probably will always be my favorite Ellen Kushner book. The central plotline follows Katherine, a cheerful young lady who gets invited to restore the family fortunes by going to live with her incredibly weird uncle in the big city and becoming a swordsman!

Unlike many plucky heroines, Katherine does not initially have really any interest at all in cross-dresing or becoming a swordsman. However, eventually she comes to enjoy swordfighting for its own sake, helped along by the mentorship of her incredibly weird uncle's nice ex-boyfriend, the necessity of dueling for a friend's honor, and the discovery that bisexuality and gender fluidity are potentially relevant concepts to her teen coming-of-age story.

...that's the A-plot! B, C, D, E, and F plots include:

- Katherine's mom's reparation of her relationship with Katherine's weird uncle
- Katherine's weird uncle's actress girlfriend's dreamy new cross-dressing fantasy Broadway show
- Katherine's weird uncle's unfortunate friendship breakup with his mathematician bestie
- Katherine's bff's attempts to overcome trauma from rape-by-fiance by engaging in romantic gay roleplay via letter-writing
- Katherine's other bff's attempts to overcome trauma from an abusive childhood by engaging in competitive voyeurism
- Katherine's bff's gigolo cousin's star-crossed romance with a scriptwriter/potter who is on the run from her abusive in-laws who do not appear in this book
- trade routes?? politics?????

I'm pretty sure that's not all the plots. There are so many plots in this book. It's fine because the plots are barely the point at best, the point is coming-of-age and life after trauma and thumbing your nose at Societal Conventions while getting to know and like yourself! I especially enjoy how in the end, spoilers )

(Note: emo murderous Alec from Swordspoint drives me up a wall in his own book, but is significantly more tolerable to me when he's just Katherine's incredibly weird uncle. I mean he still drives me up a wall here but it's much funnier when he's driving everyone else up a wall too.)
duskpeterson: (bookshelves)
[personal profile] duskpeterson
Law Links


"Sometimes I feel that he is as mysterious as the gods, and that he is hiding something of vital importance from me. Something that would transform my life."

Few events are more thrilling in a young man's life than a blood feud between two villages. Or so Adrian thought.

Torn between affection toward his traditional-minded father and worship of his peace-loving, heretical priest, Adrian finds himself caught between two incompatible visions of his duty to the gods. Then the Jackal God sends Adrian a message that will disrupt his world and send him fleeing to a new and perilous life.




LifePrison


"'You have committed a vile and savage act, one that any other nation would punish with death. Our punishment, on the other hand, will only be to give you what you want. You have sought to live in a world without boundaries of civilization, and such a world shall henceforth be your dwelling place.'"

A cold-hearted murderer. A vicious abuser. A young man hiding a shameful secret. A bewildered immigrant. A pure-minded spy.

All of these men have found their appointed places at Mercy Life Prison, where it is easy to tell who your enemies are. But a new visitor to Mercy is about to challenge decades-old customs. Now these men's worst enemies may be hiding behind masks . . . and so may their closest allies.




Checkmate


"It's all about torture. That's what I didn't understand for a long time. The High Seeker has been seeking out and punishing those of us who wish to show greater mercy to the prisoners than the Code allows. Those of us who question whether it's right to torture prisoners."

The Eternal Dungeon is no longer a prison. It's a battlefield.

Split apart from their closest loves and friends, a small group of prison-workers seek to abolish the use of torture against prisoners in the queendom's royal dungeon. Time is running out, for the deadly High Seeker has already flogged and executed prison-workers who oppose his policies.

Do the reformers have enough time and skill to bring about radical change in the dungeon? Will they be able to overcome their mistrust of one another?




To receive notices of my fiction by e-mail )

I didn't know how much I wanted this

Jul. 16th, 2017 10:45 am
ironymaiden: (9)
[personal profile] ironymaiden
official announcement of the next Doctor

(no subject)

Jul. 16th, 2017 09:37 am
skygiants: Nellie Bly walking a tightrope among the stars (bravely trotted)
[personal profile] skygiants
Rose Melikan's The Blackstone Key is one of the few books I've grabbed at random off a library shelf recently without ever having heard of it. Then I immediately grabbed the next two books, The Counterfeit Guest and The Mistaken Wife, so I guess they were doing something right, although also several things not right.

These books are deeply fluffy YA-ish Regency espionage hijinks starring Mary Finch, an impoverished orphan schoolteacher turned (by the end of the first book) surprise heiress with an unexpectedly encyclopedic knowledge of British law and an enthusiastic penchant for Adventures! !! !!!

Captain Holland, the series love interest, is an artillery officer who is good at mechanics and up on new military technologies. Other salient characteristics include:
- a terrible tendency towards sea- and carriage-sickness
- an ongoing resentful inability to understand all the clever literary and historical references being tossed around by the rest of the characters
- CONSTANT MONEY STRESS

I'll be honest, he won me over during the first book when Mary's like "am I a bad person for worrying about how the outcome of all this espionage will affect my potential inheritance?" and he's like "DEFINITELY NOT, if anybody tells you they don't stress about money THEY ARE LYING."

Rose Melikan is a scholar of the period and very good on British military history. She is not so good on plot. The first book is complete, hilariously convoluted nonsense involving SMUGGLERS and CIPHERS and MYSTERIOUS WATCHES and a SURPRISE CHANCE-MET DYING VILLAIN. It turns out that spoilers )

The second book is probably my favorite and definitely the least nonsense plot-wise; it's about the 1797 naval mutinies, and Our Heroine gets recruited to spy on a plotter because she happens to know his wife and will likely be in his house, which does not stretch suspension of disbelief too very wildly. (It's also sort of entertaining to watch the author do a careful dance between what I suspect is a personal sympathy for unionization and strike tactics and the fact that Mass Military Mutiny Is Definitely A Bad Thing, Our Characters Must Stop It At Any Cost.)

...then in Book Three we are expected to believe that an actual professional spy sees no better alternative for an important espionage mission than taking a well-known youthful heiress and society figure whose salient skills are, as aforementioned, a knowledge of British law and an enthusiasm for Adventure, and sneaking her off to Paris in a fake marriage with a clueless American painter while her respectable household desperately tries to pretend she's in London the whole time. At this point suspension of disbelief goes straight out the window again.

I have mixed feelings about Book Three in general; it's the darkest of the three and several sympathetic characters die as a direct result of Our Heroes' espionage endeavors including infuriating spoiler ) I'm not here for that! I'M HERE FOR THE HIJINKS.

Friday Five

Jul. 14th, 2017 05:51 pm
ironymaiden: (taciturn man)
[personal profile] ironymaiden
via [community profile] thefridayfive

1) Do you want to get married?
no. i am already married. i would not like to change that.

did i want to get married? not for the sake of "being married", no. but certainly at the time i thought it was the natural thing to do to express our commitment and it continues to have financial and legal advantages that i consider very important. (it was also useful to get our families to treat us like full adults.) i know people who have been shut out of making medical decisions for their partner and that set of rights is very important to me.

2) Where would you like to get married?
if i could do it again, i'm kind of obsessed with this place, which remains mysterious but seems like it should be a private club. since i probably don't have the connections for that dreamy view, The Ruins would be nice. (it's hard to tell from the website, but that swanky eccentric inside is nested inside what looks like a rotting warehouse with trees growing through the broken roof.) or maybe i would make everyone go out to Kalaloch or Doe Bay. My one regret about my actual wedding and reception was that we didn’t have a pig roast.*

3) If you were getting married in a week, who would be in your wedding party?
is that a logistical question? there were no attendants when we got married, because to be honest neither of us had wedding-party-worthy friends living nearby. [personal profile] mimerki and [personal profile] scarlettina, I guess?

...I've never been in a wedding party. There's only one person I wish had asked me and we're no longer friends.

4) What would your wedding colours be?
at the actual event i had red roses, green ivy, and heather in my bouquet; my dress and my hair were trimmed with ribbon roses in a variety of colors. nothing matched. i suppose if i had to make things match they would be green.

5) Does marriage mean to you 'til death do us part?'
well, it's working out that way so far and i hope that it continues so, but i'd be lying if i said that i never had times of doubt. i feel lucky that we've been able to work that out.

so no, i don't think it can be "til death", at least not legally or religiously. i think everyone who gets married for love thinks that it's going to last. but i think that people grow and change over their lifetimes and maybe you were really perfect together in the moment, but you don't grow in complementary ways. when that happens, you should be able to go. unhappy marriage is the worst.

*in PA there was this dude who would bring the equipment to your house. He had a rotisserie smoker he towed behind his truck and he would cook, carve, and serve a whole hog.

Even Shorter Entry

Jul. 14th, 2017 03:14 pm
berryandthorn: (jess)
[personal profile] berryandthorn
Sorry for the lack of updates, but, honestly, there hasn't been a whole lot worth writing about. I've been reading. (Mostly) keeping up with my writing goals, which is great. I also got the opportunity to apply to become a peer tutor for one of the FYEX (First Year Experiences) classes at my college, which I'll definitely do. The workload seems pretty reasonable, and I could use the extra credit. It also relates to my major (English Ed), so I really hope I can find a class that fits in with my schedule. 

Other than that, about the most interesting thing I did all week was rewatch The Magnificent Seven and The Man From U.N.C.L.E. I love both of these movies to pieces, and for similar reasons; they're both so. much. fun. I think it comes down to the chemistry between the characters--in both stories almost every interaction, between any combination of characters, is a joy to watch. The Magnificent Seven has that very stereotypical classic Western feel that I can't get enough of, and The Man From U.N.C.L.E. is so vibrant and beautiful and full of over-the-top period details. Especially Gaby's orange dresses. Seriously. Who knew orange could be such a flattering color? 

gratitude and a great salad

Jul. 13th, 2017 10:02 pm
cofax7: Iroh eating noodles (ATLA - Iroh)
[personal profile] cofax7
I really need to work on gratitude.

1. New medication for the dog, which means she no longer pees in her sleep. (Yes, it's a thing.)

2. Talking my oldest niece into reading the Montmaray novels. Which I then re-read over the weekend, and yes, I cried at that one point. (Oh, Carlos.)

3. Finally getting through to the VA about Dad's life insurance policy.

4. Making my awesome "Oceanside salad" and eating two bowls of it for dinner. [recipe below]

5. Borrowing ebooks from the local library.

*

Oceanside salad )

In other news, I really enjoyed the final Raksura novel by Martha Wells, enough to want to reread them all, except the last Court of Fives novel by Kate Elliott is coming out soon, so I want to reread all of those, but I really shouldn't.

Also, the Narnia fic exchange is up for signups this week, and I cannot decide...

what i saw July 13, 2017 at 09:52PM

Jul. 14th, 2017 04:52 am
ironymaiden: (beholder)
[personal profile] ironymaiden

Witness to unboxing Bears vs Babies something i saw

ironymaiden: (yarncore)
[personal profile] ironymaiden
I went to Weaving Works to roll the body* today. I was hoping it would be more picked over, for their sakes. I got a couple books and a skein of Arne and Carlos yarn.

anyhoo, one of them is Designs for Knitting Kilt Hose and Knickerbocker Stockings. It is so charmingly half-assed. Originally it was self-published in Scotland in 1978, and the author was about 78 at the time. It assumes that the reader is intimately familiar with kilt hose, and the concept of cuffs hiding a garter, and calf decreases.

she doesn't bother with a legend for her stitch abbreviations** until there's a section she lifted from antique pattern books. THEN there's a legend and the untranslated patterns for a couple pages.

the best part? The section on argyle where she admits that she was never able to finish an argyle sock!

I will be able to make good use of it, but a few years ago it would have been impossible for me to decipher.



*they made some poor choices when they relocated a few years ago, and they exhausted all their resources. the storefront closes this month.
**w.o. stands for wool over, which folks in the US call a yarnover.

A Solitary Blue

Jul. 13th, 2017 06:35 am
cahn: (Default)
[personal profile] cahn
The more [personal profile] mildred_of_midgard and I are diving into these books, the more I am impressed by them. They work on so many levels — the immediate visceral level, the depth of character level, but also the amount of cross-referencing and deep theme repeating and reflecting among the books is frankly scary. Some of it I'd seen before, and some of it I never really registered because they're so good on the other levels. I don't know any other books quite like these (and if you do, I definitely want to know about it).

Cut for length. )

(no subject)

Jul. 12th, 2017 11:26 pm
skygiants: Hazel, from the cover of Breadcrumbs, about to venture into the Snow Queen's forest (into the woods)
[personal profile] skygiants
With Sorrow's Knot I think I have now finished reading everything from Erin Bow's backlog, which is good in that I have consistently enjoyed it all, but bad in that I have no more Erin Bow backlog.

All of Erin Bow's work (I can now say, having read all of it) is in some way about death and undeath and the wildly unhealthy ways in which human beings react to loss; however, Sorrow's Knot is EVEN MORE explicitly about this than most. The book focuses on Otter and her friends Kestrel and Cricket, who are all pretty sure they know what they're going to do when they grow up: Kestel is going to be a ranger, Cricket is going to become a storyteller (despite being a boy and getting a certain degree of side-eye for deciding to stay in the women's village at all -- everyone knows it's dangerous in the forest and boys don't have any power to protect themselves with, sorry boys!), and Otter is going to train with her mother Willow and Willow's teacher Tamarack to learn the very important job of being a binder, aka Person Who Stops The Dead From Coming Back And Killing Us All.

Then Tamarack dies -- and then Willow abruptly and without explanation decides she doesn't want Otter becoming a binder after all -- and then the knots that stop the dead from coming back to haunt the living begin unraveling -- and then more people die -- and then Otter and friends get to go on a road trip! It's not a super fun road trip and it unsurprisingly features several close encounters with the dead.

I really liked the worldbuilding and the slow and careful work that Bow does to build out the daily lives of the characters and the culture -- it's a North American-based world without European influence, and I'm certainly not qualified to comment on how well it's done, but to me it felt interesting and non-obvious. Also, Otter's world is almost entirely composed of women and everything revolves around Significant Mother-Daughter Relationships and it's great, although Erin Bow sadly had not yet discovered lesbians as of this book. (Though I feel like perhaps this is the book that led to her discovering lesbians? Like, I do wonder if someone came up to Erin Bow and pointed out that she'd written a matriarchal village where Actual Heterosexual Romance is explicitly rare and still somehow only featured Actual Heterosexual Romance onscreen, and Erin Bow was like 'WHOOPS OK SORRY I'LL MAKE IT UP TO YOU' and then we got The Scorpion Rules. Which, I mean, if this is the case, I guess I'm not complaining, I'm very happy to have The Scorpion Rules!)

I also really liked the importance of stories and storytelling and lore and bits and pieces of information shared and not shared, but the pacing of the way those stories are shared with the reader sometimes felt a little off to me; there were occasionally times, especially towards the end, when I felt like the book was leading me to expect a Big Reveal that had already been revealed. But, I mean, the point of the book is not really to Reveal, it's to examine grief -- and as I have mentioned above, Bow is exceptionally good on grief.

Wednesday WIP

Jul. 13th, 2017 03:18 am
ironymaiden: (arty)
[personal profile] ironymaiden

I'm finally spinning the rest of the fiber that became a felted dog toy. It's...challenging. I couldn't find the right settings for my wheel, so I pulled out a drop spindle for the first time in months.

Now when the fiber is clumpy or suddenly breaks it's no big deal. (Although I hate having this not-cheap spindle hit the floor.)

This stuff has little blobs of short fiber in it (neps). You can either obsessively pick them out, or make lumpy yarn.

It's neps all the way down. Let's just call it rustic texture and admire the colors. something i saw

the Spider-Man problem

Jul. 12th, 2017 03:54 pm
ironymaiden: (Default)
[personal profile] ironymaiden
i'll start by saying that Spider-Man: Homecoming is excellent. no spoilers for the film follow.

the movie has the feel of a Marvel comic, where the characters are clearly a part of a larger world that includes both superheroes and locations that are familiar, like New York City. Peter is a 15 year old boy who lives in this world. Homecoming is well-executed, and dare i say it, better than the Raimi films. if you like Spidey, you should see it. it is definitely Spider-Man, and all the ways that it breaks away from existing tropes are good and leave me hopeful for the future of the franchise.

i won't be seeing it again for a while, though.

i love my Marvel Unlimited subscription, and whenever a character comes up, i go off and read up on their history.* the one character that i like but can't seem to read much of is Spider-Man. i could never quite put my finger on why i would read an issue or two and then walk away. Peter Parker is a great character, and well supported with a-list writers and artists.

after seeing the movie the other night, something clicked. i can't deal with the Peter sad = story good** dynamic. he's perpetually unable to enjoy his personal life or be truly happy because Spider-Man gets in the way. and so often that "Peter sad" comes from him trying to maintain his secret identity and keep his patrolling secret from people who deserve to know. or, as [personal profile] mimerki noted, he doesn't leverage his connections with his wealthy superhero friends to help with his cashflow problems nor use normal legal means to achieve his needs when it would be completely reasonable to do so. so first, there's a hell of a lot of "Peter sad" and i can only take so much of that, then there's Peter's wit only being applied to the heroing side of his life.

it's like he's perpetually punished for doing good. that's not something i actually want out of my entertainment.

it's too bad. i can't help but like the guy.



*this has mostly been delightful. a detour like Night Nurse is surprisingly good. then again, The Great Lakes Avengers i tried reading is painfully unfunny.

**i'm paraphrasing one of the Buffy the Vampire Slayer writers here. and "Buffy sad" was also a problem.
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